BSc, M.Sc., PhD

Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
King Abdulaziz Medical City – Riyadh, National Guard Health Affairs, Mail Code: 3127
P. O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Academic Appointments: Assistant Professor of Immunology

 
Tel: +(966-11-) 429-5278
Email: qahtanis  @ksau-hs.edu.sa

Profile

In October 2008, Dr. Nasr was awarded his PhD degree in Immunology from the Department of Immunology, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden. The aim of his thesis was to study the host immune-genetic factors and anti-malarial humoral immunity responses that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection among Sudanese subjects. Since August 2012, he has been committed as Academic staff (teaching/research) with the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This post is a secondment from Al-Neelain University, Khartoum, Sudan.

Responsibilities

Dr. Nasr is committed to teaching most of the immunology lectures in the different blocks in the College of Medicine as well as most of the other colleges at KSAU-HS. This includes Colleges of Dentistry, Applied Medical Sciences and the College of Sciences and Health Professions. Dr. Nasr is emerging as a researcher and expert in malaria and other infectious diseases. He has a good record of publication in both national and international journals.

Education

  • PhD degree in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Stockholm University, Sweden. October 2008
  • M.Sc. in Biology (Immuno-Biology), Faculty of Sciences, University of Khartoum, Khartoum- Sudan. March 2005
  • Diploma in Molecular Epidemiology Sciences (DMESc) with special focus on malaria, Karolinska Institute. December 2004
  • BSc in Biology, Faculty of Science - Al-Neelain University.  June 1999

Honors/Awards

  • Fellowship awarded from 6th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) Pan African Conference, October 2013, Durban. South Africa.
  • Travel grant from 40th Scandinavian Society for Immunology meeting, April 2011, Geilo, Norway.
  • Travel grant from International Congress of Immunology 22-27 August 2010, Kobe, Japan.
  • Fellowship awarded from The New York Academy of Science 2007, severe malaria meetings “seeking solutions to a complex and deadly disease” and Karolinska Institute in collaboration with the Earth Institute at Columbia University, July 2007.
  • Education grant from International Union of Immunology Societies and Federation of African Immunology Societies, for supporting the Introductory Course in Immunology in Sudan, 2-6 January, 2008.
  • PhD studies were financially supported by grants from Swedish Agency for Research Developments with Developing Countries (SIDA, SAREC), the Swedish Medical Research council (VR), as well as a grant within the BioMalPar European Network of Excellence (2005-2009).
  • A fellowship from the Swedish Institute (SI) during the period of September 2006 to September 2007.
  • Scholarship from Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden (October 2007- October 2008).
  • Travel grants from Scandinavian Society of Immunology (SSI) 2008 and 2009.
  • AMANET travel grants and scholarships 2006 and 2009.
  • Wellcome trust scholarships February 2007.
  • Faculty of Science Student Society Prize for outstanding effort in 1998.
  • “Best Work” Prize at Scientific week, Faculty of Science Student Society, 1996.

Memberships

Research Focus

In research Dr. Nasr has been working on the high affinity receptors of IgG2 mutations at position 131 on the gene level [FcγRIIa Histidine (H)/Arginine (A) 131] among Sudanese and Malian patients with P. falciparum malaria. His research interest in malaria investigates the host immune-genetic factors and anti-malarial antibodies (humoral immunity responses) that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to P. falciparum malaria infection among patients. One of his recent findings revealed that pregnant women living in KSA who are carrying the FcγRIIa H/H1131 are more likely to be less susceptible to malaria infection compared with their non- pregnant counterpart. Dr. Nasr has recently received 2 research grants from King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) to work in the role of cytokines profile/genes in immune regulation against: (a) early onset sepsis (EOS) among Saudi neonates (b) P. falciparum malaria infection among Saudi patients.

Current Research Grants 

  • Nasr A. (PI), Aljada A, Saleh AM, Al-Bawab A, The Correlation between the expression of IgG subclasses, its receptor and Cytokines polymorphism of Malaria infection among Saudi patients. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2017
  • Nasr A (PI), Fattah MA, Aljada A, Salah A, Al Fadhil A. Omer, Sif A, Manlulu R, Karar T, Ahmed A, Cytokines involve in Early and Late Onset Neonatal Sepsis immune response. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Students research The association between the PTPN22 1858C>T variant and T1D Saudi children. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2016
  • Students research Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) related to immuno-modulation for susceptibility to Graves’ disease (GD) in Saudis patients. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Students research What is the association between antibiotic exposure in the first year of life and the development of allergic disorders in children receiving health services from king Abdulaziz medical city? King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Students research The association between abnormal hemoglobin (HbS and HbC) and resistance to severe malaria infection in Saudi patients living in Jazan area. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Students research Association between the IL-12 gene polymorphism and the susceptibility of tuberculosis in Saudi patients attending to the infectious disease clinic in King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh (KAMC-R). King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Aljada A, Saleh AM, Alkathiri M, Shamsa HB, Al-Bawab A, Nasr A. Altered Sirtuin 7 Expression is Associated with Early Stage Breast Cancer. Breast Cancer (Auckl). King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018
  • Saleh AM, El-Abadelah MM, Aziz MA, Taha MO, Nasr A, Rizvi SA Mechanistic and efficacy studies of a novel synthetic anticancer agent [1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-4-trifluoromethyl pyrazolinone derivative] against acute lymphocytic leukemia. King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) 2017
  • Saleh AM, Aljada A, El-Abadelah MM, Sabri SS, Zahra JA, Nasr A, Aziz MA The Pyridone-Annelated Isoindigo (5'-Cl) Induces Apoptosis, Dysregulation of Mitochondria and Formation of ROS in Leukemic HL-60 Cells. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) 2018

 Publications

  1. Talaat IM, Nasr A, Alsulaimani AA, Alghamdi H, Alswat KA, Almalki DM, Abushouk A, Saleh AM, Allam G. Association between type 1, type 2 cytokines, diabetic autoantibodies and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in children with type 1 diabetes. J Endocrinol Invest. 2016 Aug19.
  2. Nasr A, Abushouk A, Hamza A, Siddig E, Fahal AH. Th-1, Th-2 Cytokines Profile among Madurella mycetomatis Eumycetoma Patients. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016 Jul;10(7):e0004862.
  3. Allam G, Mohamed IA, Alswat KA, Abbadi SH, Nassif R, Alharthi BJ, Nasr A. Association of IL-37 gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to tuberculosis in Saudi population. Microbiol Immunol. 2016 Oct 20.
  4. Saleh AM, El-Abadelah MM, Aziz MA, Taha MO, Nasr A, Rizvi SA. Antiproliferative activity of the isoindigo 5'-Br in HL-60 cells is mediated by apoptosis, dysregulation of mitochondrial functions and arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Cancer Lett. 2015 Jun 1;361(2):251-61.
  5. Saleh AM, Aljada A, El-Abadelah MM, Sabri SS, Zahra JA, Nasr A, Aziz MA. The Pyridone-Annelated Isoindigo (5'-Cl) Induces Apoptosis, Dysregulation of Mitochondria and Formation of ROS in Leukemic HL-60 Cells. Cell Physiol Biochem. 2015 Mar 27;35(5):1958-74.
  6. Allam G, Alsulaimani AA, Al-Zahrani A, Nasr A. Neonatal infections in Saudi Arabia: association with C-reactive protein, CRP -286 (C>T>A) gene polymorphism and IgG antibodies. Centr Eur J Immunol 2015 May 21;40(1):68-77.
  7. Allam G, Alsulaimani AA, Alzaharani AK, Nasr A. Neonatal infections in Saudi Arabia: Association with cytokine gene polymorphisms. Cent Eur J Immunol. 2015;40(1):68-77.
  8. Aljada A, Saleh AM, Alkathiri M, Shamsa HB, Al-Bawab A, Nasr A. Altered Sirtuin 7 Expression is Associated with Early Stage Breast Cancer. Breast Cancer (Auckl). 2015 Apr 9;9:3-8.
  9. Saleh AM, Aljada A, Rizvi SA, Nasr A, Alaskar AS, Williams JD. In vitro cytotoxicity of Artemisia vulgaris L. essential oil is mediated by a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in HL-60 leukemic cell line. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014 July 1;14:226.
  10. Nasr A, Allam G, Hamid O, Al-Ghamdi A. IFN-gamma and TNF associated with severe falciparum malaria infection in Saudi pregnant women. Malar J. 2014 Aug 1;13(1):314.
  11. Allam G, Alsulaimani AA, Alghamdi H, Alswat H, Edrees BM, Ahmad I, Nasr A. Changes in the Levels of Cytokines in Both Diabetic/Non-Diabetic Type I Children Living in a Moderate Altitude Area in Saudi Arabia. High Alt Med Biol. 2014 Aug 28.
  12. Nasr A, Hamid O, Al-Ghamdi A, Allam G. Anti-malarial IgG subclasses pattern and FcgammaRIIa (CD32) polymorphism among pregnancy-associated malaria in semi-immune Saudi women. Malar J. 2013 Mar 13;12:110.
  13. Nasr A, Allam G, Al-Zahrani A, Alsulaimani A. Neonatal infections in Saudi Arabia: association with C-reactive protein, CRP -286 (C>T>A) gene polymorphism and IgG antibodies. BMC Immunol. 2013 Aug 21;14:38.
  14. Yousif M, Elfadil H, Eldalo A, Nasr A. Sudanese patients' perception on safe use and disposal of injections. Saudi Journal for Health Sciences. 2012 Jun 18;1(2):99- 102.
  15. Nasr A, Eltoum M, Yassin A, ElGhazali G. Blood group O protects against complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria by the mechanism of inducing high levels of anti-malarial IgG antibodies. Saudi Journal for Health Sciences. 2012 Jan 13;1(1):16- 22.